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Curriculum Mapping

Aligning Program Components with Learning Outcomes

Identify program components that are designed to achieve each educational objective.

  • The curriculum and courses required by your program should be designed to meet your program goals and educational objectives. Clearly, students will not demonstrate the desired learning outcomes if your program components have not provided sufficient opportunity to develop them during coursework and related experiences. According to Mary Allen, "curricula should be structured to introduce key learning opportunities early and to reinforce this learning throughout."
  • The MATRIX is a tool commonly used to summarize the relationship between program components (curriculum, courses) and program goals and objectives (I = Introduced, D= Developed, M = Mastered):
MATRIX mapping program objectives to courses
COURSE OBJECTIVE I OJECTIVE II OBJECTIVE III OBJECTIVE IV OBJECTIVE V
125 I        
170   I     I
225 D        
231     D   D
331     D   D
335     D   D
400 M       M
435     M   M
  • Note that this program formally introduces, consistently practices and masters just one objective, objective V.
  • Objective II is introduced, but never practiced or mastered.
  • Objective III is never formally introduced.
  • Objective  IV is not included in the curriculum at all.
    (adapted from M. Allen, 2002, page 44)

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